Building a Killer Resume that Competes for Technical Jobs in the Marketplace

We can all agree that finding a job is not the easiest task in the world. The job market is a tough field where those with the right tools and skills will survive the hard the competition against candidates looking for the same jobs.

Getting noticed by prospective employers starts with your resume.

Hiring managers look closely at certain resumes to see if a candidate is a good match for their open position. Your resume is the first impression a hiring manager gets you—it highlights relevant facts about you, your education, and your experience; positions you in the mind of the employer, and serves as a basis for the interviewer to justify your hiring.
Bad Resumes

Bad resumes can put you at the end of the line and makes the process of finding a job more difficult. The people who have the hardest time finding a job are often the ones who insist on writing a generic résumé that lists everything they ever did hope some employer will figure out what job will fit them… but employers won’t do that; they’re looking for people who know what they want!

 

"Focus more on how you did your job, not what duties you performed. Use bullet points, starting each line with an action verb using present tense if currently employed. If it’s past employment experience, use past tense and alternate your choice of verbs."

 
Things to Consider on Your Resume

At large organizations, your résumé may first be reviewed by software that looks for keywords, not a person. That’s why your resume should change, not just as you add new experiences, but for each new type of position, you apply for. Analyze each point listed in the job description to find what are they looking for and how they describe it. Pull out keywords and “power words” and use them in your application, résumé, and cover letter. Using power words to highlight what you have accomplished will make them stand out to anyone who reviews your resume. Power words include words like managed, initiated, planned, designed, oversaw, followed through with, responsible for, programmed, coordinated, and created. You can find more power words for resume here: http://career.opcd.wfu.edu/files/2011/05/Action-Verbs-for-Resumes.pdf.

 
Things to avoid on your resume

Among things you should avoid on your resume are spelling errors, typos, and poor grammar; too duty-oriented descriptions; inaccurate or no dates; inaccurate or missing contact information; poor formatting; and paragraphs that are too long. Also, avoid including personal information unrelated to the job.
Questions to Ask Yourself When Writing About Job Experience

 

  • What did I do?
  • How did I do it?
  • Why did I do it that way?
  • What were the results? (Quantify results whenever possible.)

 

Focus more on how you did your job, not what duties you performed.

Use bullet points, starting each line with an action verb using present tense if currently employed. If it’s past employment experience, use past tense and alternate your choice of verbs. Tailor your list of skills and experiences to the position you want and be concise while providing enough detail. Try to include the amount of experience in this line of work, training or education, special accomplishment or recognition, key skills, and talents or special knowledge. Also, something about your attitude or work ethics will help.

Prove you’re the best candidate for that particular job by starting with the right resume.

 

Alexis Van Bevers

Alexis Van Bevers
Human Resources
Alexis | @Soulshine82